Dayna’s Trainings

Ethics

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Embodied Ethics

Drawing upon current research on the wisdom of our bodies in attachment and trauma work, ethics are explored through a new lens. We have been applying these models to our work with clients and now it’s time to focus inward to further develop our ethical responses. This training combines expressive arts through movement, gestures, and body postures with contemplative exercises and interactive discussions. 

 

We will somatically explore boundaries with physical poses and identify the mind-body connection in ethical decision making. Case examples are used regarding the ethical use of technology to further awareness of listening to one’s body. Ethical values are considered in the context of the 3 intelligent centers of the clinician’s body.

Supervisory Ethics

Standards in ethical codes pertaining to supervision are reviewed with the participants. Written exercises and discussions are used to explore supervisory boundaries; remote and electronic supervision; evaluation of supervisees; and responses to ethical supervision dilemmas. Participants will also construct a Supervisory Genogram to explore their own supervision history.

Writing Your Ethical Eulogy

Writing Your Ethical Eulogy is a training which allows participants to thoughtfully immerse themselves in exercises designed to create an ideal professional ethical identity. Using guided imagery, journal exercises, and discussion participants are escorted through a process to write their ethical eulogy and then develop an ideal Ethical Identity Mission Statement and Action Plan. Finally, participants will learn the important components to include in a Professional Will.

Ethics on a Cloudy Day: Developing Action Plans for Ethically Cloudy Questions

Ethics on a Cloudy Day: Developing Action Plans for Technologically Cloudy Questions brings ethics training into the modern era. Participants learn how to develop an Action Plan for responding to ethical dilemmas and “get their head out of the clouds.” Ethical questions are presented reflecting new challenges and cloudy situations arising with technological advances. 

Going Once, Going Twice: The Ethical Values Auction

The trainer serves as the Ethics Auctioneer in this invigorating training. Participants are led through an activity to prioritize their Ethical Values before beginning the bidding process of the auction using $1,000 in EthicalValue Bucks provided. Once all of the Ethical Values have been auctioned off, an ethical dilemma is introduced and participants use their Ethical Values and Code of Ethics to decide upon an ethical response. Large groups will need an Auctioneer for each group of ten people.

Ethical Code Scavenger Hunt

The Ethical Code Scavenger Hunt is a lively, engaging, and thought provoking way to learn ethics. 

Objectives of the training are to identify specific Standards in applicable professional Code of Ethics pertaining to responsibilities to clients and colleagues, including issues of diversity, fee setting, documentation, disclosures, and client rights. This one hour training can be adapted to extend the time frame.

Ethics Trivia Game

The Ethics Trivia Game is a fast paced way to learn ethics. Participants are divided into teams to answer questions using their applicable professional Code of Ethics. Categories for the trivia questions include: confidentiality, diversity, documentation, technology, relationships with clients, competence, conflicts of interest, and research. Ethical Trivia Questions are included in the handouts.

 

The objectives for the Ethics Trivia Game are to: 1) identify ethical Standards of competence in technology and diversity; and 2) identify ethical Standards of confidentiality and conflicts of interest. This training can be adapted from one to three hours.

Ethical Charades

Charades is the name of this ethics interactive training in which participants divide into teams and pantomime to their team members ethical references pulled from an Ethical Charades Card deck (included). Teams get points for correct guesses and additional points for correctly identifying Ethical Codes and Standards corresponding to each title. The objectives of the training are to apply relevant Ethical Standards to ethical references.

Ethical Dilemmas: Choose Your Own Adventure

Aiming to keep ethics training lively and innovative, Ethical Dilemmas: Choose Your Own Adventure allows participants to explore possible outcomes for their ethical decision making process as the protagonist in complex situations. We will review various scenarios which raise questions for ethical debate; examine professional ethical codes and standards related to the situations posed; choose possible options; and discover likely outcomes to those decisions. Topics will include professional and cultural competency, boundaries, informed consent, conflicts of interest, privacy and confidentiality, relationships, technology, and documentation.

Developing Ethical Resources

 Developing Ethical Resources builds on trauma informed therapies which develop resources for clients as an initial step in the treatment process. Using this as a model, participants are led through an exercise to identify resources for ethical practice. Participants will then choose one ethical resource and design an action plan to ensure its implementation.

 

Objectives of Developing Ethical Resources are to identify resources for ethical practice and design an action plan to implement an ethical resource. Handouts are included for the written exercises.

Developing Ethical Rituals

Developing Ethical Rituals engages helping professionals in a combination of contemplative exercises with expressive arts to explore the meaning they ascribe to ethics. Participants study their applicable professional Code of Ethics and choose an object to symbolize an ethical Value, Principle, or Standard (such as a box to symbolize a boundary). They are guided through a journaling exercise which leads them to identify and adopt new ethical rituals in their practice.

The objective of Developing Ethical Rituals is to discuss how rituals in professional practice relate to ethical efficacy. This one hour training is easy to adapt for other professionals, clients, and organizations.

Setting Ethical Boundaries with Your Body

Setting Ethical Boundaries With Your Body is an ideal opportunity for helping professionals to somatically explore this prevalent topic of ethics. Participants discuss the definition of boundaries and terms related to boundaries (included in the handouts). Various types of somatic boundaries are then reviewed and participants are asked to explore these boundaries with physical poses. They are led through an exercise recalling recent ethical decisions and identifying the mind-body connection to these decisions.

The objectives of Setting Ethical Boundaries With Your Body include: 1) defining boundaries and terms related to boundaries; and 2) and recognizing the relationship between the mind-body connection and ethical decision making. This quick, one hour training is excellent for both new and experienced helping professionals alike.

Ethics in Motion

This innovative training, Ethics in Motion, combines learning ethics through body and sensory awareness with addressing modern issues related to technology. Participants are led through an activity involving making gestures representing a variety of feelings and emotions, such as self-confidence, shame, and fear. A discussion on the relation of these gestures to ethical challenges is facilitated by the trainer. Using the Gendlin Method of Focusing, participants will identify body sensations and awareness as specific ethical case scenarios are presented. These cases are then discussed by referring to applicable ethical codes. The final activity includes a game of team Password using sensory vocabulary (adapted from Ogden’s Sensorimotor Psychotherapy) and answering questions of ethical dilemmas related to technology.

The objectives of the Ethics in Motion are to identify body sensations and awareness when faced with ethical dilemmas related to technology. This three hour training can easily be adapted to a shorter time frame. It is also suited for other professionals and clients individually and in groups.

The Grain of Truth: Enacting Ethics Through the Use of Sand Trays

The Grain of Truth: Enacting Ethics Through the Use of Sand Trays is a novel approach to studying ethics experientially.  Using sand trays individually and as a group, this training guides participants to integrate ethical decision making from the symbolic to the actual. Written exercises and an ethical dilemma scenario are included in the handouts.

The objectives of this training are to: 1) identify ethical issues related to multiple relationships and diversity; 2) describe the difference between healthy boundaries, boundary crossings, and boundary violations; and 3)  symbolically represent an ideal ethical identity. This activity can easily be adapted for other professionals and clients individually and in groups.

The Many Faces of Ethics: Making Masks

The Many Faces of Ethics: Making Masks uses mask making to explore the internal and external images we present to the world. In this mask making training, the internal and external images participants create will focus on their professional ethics personas. Each person has an internal image of themselves which they often do not share with others. In mask making, we portray this internal image on the inside of our masks referring to it as our shadow or repressed side. The outside of the mask is designed with the image of ourselves we want others to see; this is our successful professional persona. Participants are guided through a series of journal prompts to explore the external face they present professionally as compared to their internal world. Each participant is given a mask to paint and collage on the outside and inside depicting this presentation. Various ethical issues and dilemmas are presented to continue an in-depth consideration of ethical conduct.

The objectives of The Many Faces of Ethics are to: 1) identify cultural beliefs and biases conflicting with current ethical codes; 2) identify healthy ways to manage anxiety when faced with an ethical dilemma; 3) outline an ethical decision making model; and 4) articulate the ethical identity portrayed in a collaged mask. This training can be adapted for clients and other professionals.

 

Creating Ethical Super Powers

Creating Ethical Super Powers is a fun approach to learning ethics. Using a clip from the animated film, The Incredibles, sets the stage for  participants to create an Ethical Super Power. The workshop combines an expressive arts exercise with discussions on the potential ethical misuses or abuses in the power dynamic between professional and client. The objective of Creating Ethical Super Powers is to describe potential ethical misuses or abuses in the power dynamic between professional and  client. This expressive arts activity can be adapted for clients individually and in groups.

Ethical Sculptures

Ethical Sculptures is an expressive arts activity using modeling clay to explore ethics. Participants will identify a list of ethical values in a group discussion. Then they will choose one ethical value and form a representation of it with modeling clay. A handout provides questions for participants to reflect upon and answer. Finally, a group sculpture will be made representing an ethical value using Virginia Satir’s experiential intervention of family sculpting.

The objectives of Ethical Sculptures are to: 1) identify a list of ethical values; and 2) represent an ethical value without words using modeling clay. 

Ethical Courage: Accessing Your Ethical Super Powers

Much has been written on moral courage, especially in the last few years. Participants are introduced to the concept of Ethical Courage which is the willingness to take ethical action despite doubts, the risk of fear, or adverse consequence. Ethical Courage requires careful deliberation; assessment of multiple variables; self-regulation; choosing an ethical response; taking action; and evaluating the outcome. Reflecting on the various Ethical Codes for mental health professionals (NASW, APA, ACA, and AAMFT) applicable Ethical Standards are discussed in reference to Ethical Courage. Social Justice, Diversity, Integrity, Competence, and Dignity are some of the ethical values examined. Finally, participants will be introduced to an Ethical Courage Decision Making Model and given opportunities to apply this model to clinical practice.

 

Weaving a Collective Tapestry of Ethical Manifestos

 

As health care workers our mission is to enhance human well-being and help meet the basic needs of all people, individually and as a society. On a daily basis the concept of ‘well-being’ is passionately debated with polarized opinions dividing not only our country but also our profession. 

Ethical Codes provide us with principles and values which refer to ideas, qualities, and standards we use as guideposts. In addition to our Ethical Codes we have been trained in various clinical theories and treatment modalities. Our challenge in this training will be to collectively take some of our Ethical Codes, theories, and modalities to write action statements, Ethical Manifestos, declaring our intentions to enhance human well-being and help meet the needs of all people. We will weave a collective tapestry of Ethical Manifestos by the end of our time together.

Please note: participants will join together in small groups, whether live in-person or on-line in Zoom breakout rooms in this training. Active participation is required.  

This is a 3 hour training and we’ve created an animated film to go along with the lecture (it’s pretty cool and very different from the usual PowerPoint format.) Participants will also be actively engaged in creating the Ethical Manifestos.

Building Ethical Systems

This full day training, Building Ethical Systems, is specifically designed for organizations to discuss their ethical work environment. It is an ideal way to obtain training hours during a work retreat, allowing for organizational self-assessment and appraisal. Team building exercises lead participants from the same organization to develop and play a game pertaining to ethics. Opportunities to examine the organizational Mission Statement, Ethical Values and Principles, and social diversity considerations are provided. Ethical dilemmas and decision making processes are built into the development of the game.

The objectives of this training are to: 1) describe ethical values and principles in an organization’s Mission Statement; 2) identify possible social diversity issues within an organization and 3) describe ethical decision making processes within an organization. The training can be adapted to a shorter time frame and for student groups.

 

Supervision

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Advanced Clinical Supervision

Come prepared for an interactive day of practicing Clinical Supervision. This day of training is for experienced Clinical Supervisors. 

Our focus will be on the following concepts: skill development of the supervisee; using theory/knowledge/education models in supervision; ethical considerations in supervision; use of self of the supervisee; use of self of the supervisor; importance of supportive supervision to manage stress and discouragement of supervisee; content vs process in supervision; and systems theory regarding clinical supervision.

Super Vision: Developing Your Own Supervisory Style

Most clinicians have trained for years to learn their craft, becoming therapists after studying in graduate school, completing internships and gaining licensure. This is not the case with clinical supervisors. In this 6 hour training you will have an opportunity to develop your own style of clinical supervision, building upon your knowledge base as a therapist and adding to it the necessary components of effective supervision. We will discuss how to choose your supervision approach based on the developmental needs of your supervisee; learn how to be comfortable with the concept of ‘use of self’ in supervision; discuss boundaries in the age of technology and ethical challenges supervisors face; and each participant will develop clear supervisory goals.

Parenting

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The Parental Tool Box

Parenting is the initial source of the primary attachment, yet helping parents is often overlooked in the treatment process with children and adolescents. How many times have you heard parents say, “That’s all fine and good, but what should I do?”

Enter the Clinical Tool Box which we will assemble in this interactive training. Regardless of the treatment modality being used, having practical strategies to help parents implement effective relationship and communication skills allows the clinician to offer concrete guidance and maximize therapeutic and clinical impact by interweaving them into your current practice.

We will start with The 3 R’s of Reframe, Replace, and Rewire which is a strength based approach drawing on research of trauma, neurology, and biochemistry. Your tool box will quickly fill up with skills and strategies used to create family harmony while stacking up success for all involved.

Parenting: An Opportunity of a Lifetime

 

Bodyfulness is the union of heart, mind, and body. It allows us to be present with our children in a playful and loving manner.

In this workshop we explore the integrated experience of bodyfulness which opens us to attunement and mutual respect. Experience and share the joys which make parenting an opportunity of a lifetime. This workshop will also explore the themes that show up in one of the many chapters in her book The Parental Toolbox.

A home in which power struggles are rare is a happier and more intimate home in which all members feel supported, appreciated and validated. It is a safe and mutually respectful environment where people can grow and in which healthy relationships are modeled and able to be replicated in your child’s future friendships and personal and professional relationships.

Intended Audience: Parents, Educators

Clinical

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A Day of Play

Play in therapy can serve many purposes. By engaging in play with children, therapists are able to establish a relationship with a child, gain an understanding of the concerns and issues that are important in a child’s life, and communicate with a child in ways that facilitate the child’s growth towards health and well-being. 

In order for a therapist to engage in play effectively with children, they need to be comfortable not only with an understanding of child development and child mental health and the many different ways it can go awry, but also with the medium of play. In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to experience different types and functions of play using sand and sand toys, art materials, and dolls and/or puppets; and will have the opportunity to create a book or game for use in play therapy. 

 

 

Contact

Call

(828)-251-5371

Email

dayna@daynaguido.com